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rachel rector lingerie

I usually don’t pay much attention to my undergarments; I typically go for comfort and if anything else, something cute. It doesn’t usually occur to me that my style can extend to lingerie. I’d love to be shown the way, and I think Rachel Rector’s  modern designs could do just that.

Rachel Rector lingerie // summer lookbook '13

This Brooklyn-based designer crafts lovely pieces using bright and sweet colors with bold lines and classic silhouettes. Her lovingly made creations are intended to provide support in more ways than one. Boosting your booty and your confidence? I say yes.

Rachel Rector lingerie // fall '13

But in order to get these beauties out to the world, Rachel is seeking some Kickstartin’ help! Please share her campaign if you can and spread the word out. RR lingerie is a wonderful alternative to the mass-produced cookie cutter bras and such you find in the mall; wouldn’t you like to wear something underneath that’s as beautiful and unique as you are? One glance at these lookbooks and I know you’ll want to wear undergarments on the outside as much as I do. 

new instalove

Ever since I received my VERY FIRST smartphone for Christmas, I’ve been instagramming like a mad woman. I’ve always been pretty addicted to the app and I can’t believe I’ve not even been using it for a year. Now that I don’t have to borrow my boyfriend’s phone, I’ve been able to instagram whenever and wherever my heart desires! Here are some of my favorites over the past month or so. To see more everyday beauty, follow me @tideandbloom!

nature

naturewalk  chattanoogaflight  o4w

art

macaron  sketchsketch2  sketch3

food

pho  dessert2dessert  bbq

life

rug  picnicdance  boots 

creative masters: jacob van loon

When I first began this interview series, I had no idea what I was in for. I thought it could be a fun side project that would push me to connect with other creative individuals and provide a platform for the inspirational voices of others. It indeed does those things, but I couldn’t have predicted how important it would become to me, to my own journey. The opportunity to ask a question and have it genuinely answered with thought and care, is a joy I truly cherish now. To think that people I admire would generously give me their time and a piece of their mind… well, it just really humbles me and motivates me.

interview with artist Jacob Van Loon

I can say without a doubt that this interview is one I’ve anticipated more than any other. Why is that, you ask? Well, it’s a multitude of things. Jacob Van Loon is an artist I’ve admired via tumblr for a while now; I stumbled upon his work organically and have been a fan ever since. Watch the video below and you’ll understand why I’m so enraptured. The infrastructure he builds with pencil and paint is complex and layered, existing somewhere in-between creation and destruction. I’d like to think (maybe hope is the better word) that the universe I draw within could maybe be a neighbor to his own. But enough words from me. Van Loon is the 27-year old sage here and his words are the ones I want to share with you.

[youtube=http://youtu.be/2TNW8oY-Tys]

composing a gallery wall

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I’ve always loved a great gallery wall, especially given the fact that most of my art is of a smaller size. But when you’re staring at a huge blank wall with a pile of frames on the floor, the task can seem a bit daunting. Where do you begin? How do you choose what goes where? Do you map out a diagram or do you just wing it? There’s a few different answers to these questions and it really all depends upon what your style is. The awesome thing about gallery walls is that you really can’t go wrong. I’ve seen them done well in so many different ways – asymmetrical, monochromatic, with found objects… you get the picture. So don’t afraid to jump in! Composing a gallery wall is much like composing a painting and you won’t be able to envision the final picture until you’re knees deep in the process. Here are some steps to help you get closer to creating your masterpiece.

color

creative makers: bethany putnam of foxboxes

I am so ecstatic to be continuing my Creative Makers and Creative Masters series! I had fallen off track because of how busy I was in the past few months, but I’m on the road again and ready to introduce you to some seriously awesome entrepreneurs. 

Sitting down for coffee with Bethany Putnam reminded me how much I love interviewing other creative individuals; she’s a kindred spirit with a warm heart and a genuine desire to help others connect with their life’s bliss. I felt so comfortable chatting with her that I easily forgot I was supposed to be asking her actual questions! Bethany acts as one half of Foxboxes, bringing vintage-themed flasks to the drinkers of Atlanta and Los Angeles alike. Their sweet and nostalgic creations feature upcycled antique imagery with a cheeky sense of humor and whimsy to match. Having just been voted Best Indie Crafter in Creative Loafing, it’s easy to see that Foxboxes is on a steep trajectory towards indie craft stardom.

Bethany Putnam of Foxboxes | tide & bloom

emily green designs

Emily_Green_Hobe

I’m totally feelin’ on these psychedelic designs by Melbourne based artist Emily Green. Watercolor patterns are all the rage these days, but hers seem especially fresh, straightforward with a lovely clarity of color and shape. emily-green-print-strength_in_numbers_collage_one

studio daydreams

During my college years, I spent many a night (and morning) toiling away at projects in my various classroom studios. At the time I dreaded it – the lack of sleep, the feeling like I couldn’t possibly have enough time to make something worthy of presenting, the endlessness of it all. Little did I know that not too many years later, it would be a lifestyle I miss.

enviable studio spaces | tide & bloom

pinspired: patterns

In case you couldn’t tell already, I love patterns. I love looking at patterns, figuring out patterns, creating patterns. I only wish I had more reasons/time/media to make patterns for! Here are some of my favorites from my pattern Pinterest board.

floral
floral

geometric
geometric

abstract
abstract

fruit
fruit

To see more of my beloved Pinterest addictions, be sure to follow me!

 

creative makers: rachael riedinger of neva opet

I began my Creative Masters interview series in order to feature creative entrepreneurs who are a shining example of manifesting your goals and dreams. However, I quickly realized that there is just as much inspiration to be found in a newcomer – particularly because their decision to pursue passion over practicality is recent and fresh in their minds and hearts. I now present to you a “sister” series that I will call Creative Makers: a showcase of artisans, performers, and business owners who are new to the game and ready to give it their all. 

Within five minutes of meeting Rachael at Thread Count, I knew we would become fast friends. Her infectious laughter and evident love for all things well-made really made me feel like she was a kindred spirit from a previous lifetime. After only meeting me once, she so graciously opened up her home and studio to show me where the leather magic happens. That’s right people – leather. magic! Rachael Riedinger is the creator of Neva Opet, a line of hand-crafted purses and accessories that exemplify a modern take on the marriage between functionality and form. Her gorgeous array of leather and canvas bags were enough to make me swoon, but after getting to know her over iced lattes (made by Rachael herself) and scrumptious pastries, I knew I wouldn’t go home without one of her beautiful creations. Her work is dripping with passion and can be found via Neva Opet’s website, Etsy, and Facebook. Be sure to keep tabs on this one, ladies. I’m sure in a few years you will have wish you had bought one of her bags today!

Neva Opet: leather working tools | tide & bloom

First things first. Describe the personality or type of woman you make your bags for.

I make my bags for myself and for women like me. I like minimal things done in great materials that will last a lifetime. A woman like me is someone who appreciates art, design, and minimalism – likes things a bit more understated. I think shopping habits have taken a change and people want to purchase things that they will keep forever. I’m hoping people won’t treat my bags preciously or baby them because they are meant to live and mature with their owners. The materials I use only get more awesome with age.

That’s a cool way to look at an accessory – like a lifetime companion. So how did you learn to make what you make? Where did the impulse come from?

Well I started sewing when I was 14 years old. My mom gave me a sewing machine for Christmas and I started sewing all the vintage silhouettes and patterns I couldn’t find in stores at the time – like peg leg pants (skinny jeans) or just band patches onto my jackets. It just snowballed from there so I’ve been sewing for 11 years now. I just really enjoy making things and after one really awful job, I decided that I wanted to do something that I love. Even if it pays half as much, I’m still so much happier. In regards to the leather work specifically, I’m entirely self-taught. It took a long time to figure out the ins and outs of leather and I still learn something new every time I work. But because of that, each bag I make is better than the one before it.

Neva Opet: Rachael Riedinger | tide & bloom

Neva Opet: Rachael Riedinger | tide & bloom

Which part of the crafting process do you enjoy most?

Hmm. That’s tough. On one hand, I really love the transformation of materials – seeing the fabric or leather become a finished product. But I also really love it when I see that someone else enjoys the bag as much as I enjoyed making it. It’s just such a gratifying thing to see a stranger say “I love this,” and it makes me want to design more. Otherwise, I’d probably just end up with a bunch of bags in a room.